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Why not shoot HDR next time!!!

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Rjmiz
383 posts
Message posted at 05/06/2007, 06:37:12 AM by Rjmiz
What is HDR? .......shouldI shoot HDR?....Are they any advantages to HDR?



HDR stands for "High Dynamic Imaging"

How this is accomplish is a combination of shooting technique, and software that will produce it.



How this works is: You take a minimum of 3 shots of a subject on a tripod.

One exposed perfectly (using any f stop of choice) and the other two...1 under and 1 overexposed changing speed.



an example below



 Dreamstime generic image 



Now using software that will line up, and combine the 3 images (I use ps)

you get better shadows and highlights, a more "Dynamic" range if you will.



The image below demonstrates this better than I can explain it.

The image left is the HDR and right the perfectly exposed image that would have been produced by the camera naturally.



 Image not available or id is incorrect. 



A closer view below.



 Image not available or id is incorrect. 



Why not try it! HDR works best when the image itself displays potential dynamic range.

You can not squeeze HDR from an image that does NOT have Dynamic Range in the first place.

So HDR is not suitable for every image you take. Where you have lots of shadows, and highlights works though.
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Lightart
1314 posts
56
Message posted at 05/06/2007, 13:35:15 PM by Lightart
Great post. Also its good to know that HDR process isn't good for windy days where a lot of your scene might be in motion (unless you're going for that artsy look), or for those who are running 256 or 512 Meg of RAM. You'll bring your system to a screeching halt in most cases. Otherwise it can be a magical experience for those images that require a wide exposure range outside the sensor's capability. And oh yeah. . .you'll need a tripod. :)



don
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Orchidpoet
264 posts
Message posted at 05/07/2007, 14:07:41 PM by Orchidpoet
What's the major advantage of this method comparing to applying multiple layers? Thanks.


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Ichtor
215 posts
<10
Message posted at 05/11/2007, 13:38:47 PM by Ichtor
I would say the main advantage is that you don't have to muck around with layer masks, alignment and such.
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Lightart
1314 posts
56
Message posted at 05/11/2007, 16:27:44 PM by Lightart

Originally posted by Orchidpoet:
Quoted Message: What's the major advantage of this method comparing to applying multiple layers? Thanks.




If you read any tutorials on HDR, you'll notice most will mention that manipulating multiple layers of the same image is not the same as taking, say, three separately exposed images at three different exposure levels. The effective dynamic range of any image is not increased by simply layering it three times and then adjusting the exposures in each one and masking off the areas of interest. But by taking three separate exposures. .or four. . .or five. . you can, in theory, end up with a photo that when put together as an HDR document has a huge dynamic exposure range from which to work . . .because you have incrementally exposed each image to take advantage of a limited range of tonal values instead of trying to average ONE image and then stretch to get to the lights and darks later through layer adjustments.
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Pinfoldphotos
279 posts
76
Message posted at 05/11/2007, 16:54:01 PM by Pinfoldphotos
As good a shot as it is, I dont think that the example posted by Rjmiz does the technique full justice - i've seen some spectacular shots on various websites where the combination of a much wider range of exposures give a superb final image and demonstrate the capabilities of the technique.



It's well worth exploring for those who have the time to spare - which unfortunately I haven't!



Ian


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Diomedes66
622 posts
79
Message edited at 05/11/2007, 18:12:05 PM by Diomedes66
To further illustrate Lightart's and Robert's point - here is an HDR I made some months ago - 5 exposures 1 stop apart.

 Desert Saguaro 81 
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Orchidpoet
264 posts
Message posted at 05/12/2007, 10:59:18 AM by Orchidpoet
Very interesting. Thanks for enlightening me.



Which software do you use to line the images up? How?


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Lightart
1314 posts
56
Message posted at 05/12/2007, 11:48:06 AM by Lightart

Originally posted by Orchidpoet:
Quoted Message: Very interesting. Thanks for enlightening me.



Which software do you use to line the images up? How?




You must use a tripod and not move your camera but simply change your exposure settings, either through the cameras ability to auto bracket or manually, for each shot. The Photoshop HDR process will actually layer the images and align them for you then provide you with a single image for processing as you wish.
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Orchidpoet
264 posts
Message posted at 05/12/2007, 12:00:40 PM by Orchidpoet
Thanks LightArt. I shall give it a try sometime!


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Lightart
1314 posts
56
Message posted at 05/12/2007, 12:39:27 PM by Lightart
You're welcome. :)
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