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Search - Words in the Image Descriptions

Red
When I do a search, images often show up in the wrong areas because of words that are only found in the Description field. For example, I searched for Wonder Woman and got this image -



 Crescent Spring   



The words wonder and woman are not in the keywords but are in the description, "Crescent Spring can be called a natural wonder in the Gobi Desert. Some say it reminds them of the eye of a beautiful woman..."



So, as I might consider this spamming, the words that placed it into the search were only found in the description - the contributor in no way tried to mislead anyone. As a buyer I would be annoyed that this image was among my search results.



So, does every word in the Description area of an image apply as a keyword? Inquiring minds want to know. 
Edited: 07/29/2009, 17:07:29 PM
Phakimata
Sometimes words are used in descriptions that are not necessarily keywords. Though those words are in the search engine. In case of spam, what you are referring to, you should simply flag the inappropriate image within a search. If it is indeed spam, then you get rewarded $0.02.

These words walk the fine line between useful and spam.



Cheers,

Paul.
Posted: 07/29/2009, 17:31:31 PM
Stuartkey
A similar situation would a shot of somewhere unique to the Isle of Man, in the UK. The description could perfectly legitimately use the name "Isle of Man" but this causes the image to show up in a search for 'man'.





Posted: 07/29/2009, 18:41:57 PM
Red
I understand what keyword spamming is and flag the images I run across with obvious spam (support must be thinking, "Oh no, here's another bad keywords report from Red"). I'm just pondering how big a part the description plays in search engine placement - are certain key description words considered or all description words? I tend to write long descriptions hoping they will spur the buyer towards choosing my image over others. These descriptions may make my images show up in odd searches. But, hey, I've sold many an image where the buyer hasn't specified any keywords in their search.
Posted: 07/29/2009, 19:50:52 PM
Tangie
member is an admin
You are allowed to write concepts and interpretations in the descriptions however, make sure they do not render your descriptions necessarily long. Descriptions should actually be descriptive. Adding phrases of the type: "some may interpret or see this as" is not recommendable. Especially if they add information that is not quite relevant for the image. If your sentence is based on actual known facts, you could say something like: "This is also known as The Hill of the Knight". Anyway, when we review flags/reports, we pay attention to such information in your descriptions.

Edited: 07/30/2009, 01:36:07 AM by Admin
Saorsa

Originally posted by Tangie:
Quoted Message: You are allowed to write concepts and interpretations in the descriptions however, make sure they do not render your descriptions necessarily long. Descriptions should actually be descriptive. Adding phrases of the type: "some may interpret or see this as" is not recommendable. Especially if they add information that is not quite relevant for the image. If your sentence is based on actual known facts, you could say something like: "This is also known as The Hill of the Knight". Anyway, when we review flags/reports, we pay attention to such information in your descriptions.





Quite a lot of tourist attractions have the "some say ..." sort of story with them.



For example, "Some say the Olgas near Ayers Rock were so named because they reminded the discoverer of a woman's bottom" Now, having been there, I suspect he had been away from home a looooonnnng time before naming it but, the "Some say ..." is just a common linquistic tool.
VR, 70-200mm VR, 50mm f1.8E Micro 105mm VR, 60mm f2.8D Micro-Nikkor...
Posted: 07/30/2009, 08:06:21 AM
Madelaide
I have the opposite opinion about DT using description in the search. In most cases, I believe it helps set relevance. If you have "white dog" at description ("White dog sitting in front of a house") and keywords, it is probably a more relevant for someone searching for "white dog" than an image in which this term isn't used because it doesn't describe the image.



Also relevance should consider proximity for optimzied results. For instance: "white dog sitting in front of a house" is more relavant for this search than "black dog on white background".

with Canon 400D, Canon 17-40L and 28-135 lenses.
Previously usi...
Posted: 08/02/2009, 13:49:57 PM
Aprilj
I kind of get the idea of what my description on each photo should be, but I am still a little in wonder. I am thinking that it should tell where the shot was taken and maybe a little about the place. Please help me to understand it better. I am working on my first uploads and want to do these as best as I can. I am also wondering about the keywords....should they be words that describe the picture also.
28-80mm lens...
Posted: 03/14/2013, 08:36:22 AM
Perstock
As in news journalism: truth and relevant...

I am actually a frequent image buyer and I use more than just one or two words for an imagesearch. The more specific, the faster hit.

One thing I really miss is an automatic function telling if an image is vertical, horizontal, quadratic or panorama!

When searching pics for a magazine cover it sometimes feel meaningless to look through 1000 images when two thirds are horizontal...

Another thing - many descriptions are to word poor! Sometimes it is very useful to know where that beautiful beach was photographed...

Subject for a book maybe :-)
Nikon system. D750 and D7100 are the latest cameras.
Edited: 03/14/2013, 12:15:08 PM
Red
It's there under Advanced Search

Image Properties - Orientation: Portrait, Landscape, Square, Panorama
Posted: 03/14/2013, 12:30:10 PM
Perstock
:-)
Nikon system. D750 and D7100 are the latest cameras.
Posted: 03/14/2013, 12:41:26 PM