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PSD or TIFF?

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<10
Message posted at 10/24/2011, 00:52:49 AM by Owaisphotography
hi

can you guys tell me which image formate is should use while post processing/Editing?

i am working on my pictures but can't complete in one day i have to save file and next day i will continue my work..and i don't want to loss quality and my work on pictures??


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Nicku
460 posts
Message posted at 10/24/2011, 01:37:34 AM by Nicku
Definitely the PSD format.
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TMarchev
1232 posts
75
Message posted at 10/24/2011, 07:34:17 AM by TMarchev
Yes but and TIFF is good ... don't worry save on what you like..
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Diavata
530 posts
Message posted at 10/25/2011, 00:55:38 AM by Diavata

Originally posted by Nicku:
Quoted Message: Definitely the PSD format.




I don't agree.

I used to work with PSD format before, but at some point (after saving the file a few times) I noticed severe compression. I then compaired this file to the first file (that I had on a backup drive) and the difference was huge!

From there on, I've started working with TIFF. The files are bigger, but at least you can save it as much as you want, without loss of quality.
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Nicku
460 posts
Message posted at 10/25/2011, 01:12:56 AM by Nicku

Originally posted by Diavata:
Quoted Message: I don`t agree.I used to work with PSD format before, but at some point (after saving the file a few times) I noticed severe compression. I then compaired this file to the first file (that I had on a backup drive) and the difference was huge!From there on, I`ve started working with TIFF. The files are bigger, but at least you can save it as much as you want, without loss of quality.




Ok. You save the image as tiff. What happen when you work with layers and the next day you want to continue the work on that specific image and want to modify one specific layer????
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Diavata
530 posts
Message posted at 10/25/2011, 05:49:51 AM by Diavata
Then I just do it.

There is no difference between PSD or TIFF in that regard.
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Nicku
460 posts
Message posted at 10/25/2011, 06:45:00 AM by Nicku
Maybe i miss something here... you say you can save a file in TIFF format with and hold the layers intact????
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Red
1626 posts
Message posted at 10/25/2011, 09:11:07 AM by Red
There is no difference in quality between the layered PSD and a layered TIFF file, they are both lossless formats, no image data is lost or changed. Yes, you can save layered TIFF files but some problems arise if you are using those files in certain other programs. Same with PSD. Actually, you may be able to use a layered TIFF with more non-Adobe software. If you are going to use layered files of either format you need to know what programs they are compatible with. Depends on your workflow. If you never import layered files of either format into other programs you can work on what you are familiar with. It also depends on the size of your files and the power of your computer. Generally, layered TIFFs are larger files and may take longer to open.


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TMarchev
1232 posts
75
Message posted at 10/25/2011, 09:57:53 AM by TMarchev
Haha:)

.TIFF files can be archived! I have personally archived 200mb .TIFF file and the archive is not larger than 5 MB. Also I do not know whether Nicku know that .TIFF has an option to retain the layer, there is transparency!

.TIFF is better and for printing !!!

So do not talk before you know better:)



MORE INFO:

http://www.awaresystems.be/imaging/tiff/faq.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tagged_Image_File_Format
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Red
1626 posts
Message posted at 10/25/2011, 10:14:12 AM by Red
The discussion is not only about TIFF vs PSD, but layered files. Often, post-processing work on an image is done on layers so you can control certain sections of an image independently. One must take into account the final use of the images in question. At one point, not so much now, EPS files were the file format of preference when inserting images into page layout programs that were sent to be printed - ink on paper - so when you say TIFF is better for printing it depends on what type of printing you are talking about. Many magazine/catalog printers prefer pdfs and in that case it doesn't matter the file format of the images that were used to produce that high resolution pdf.


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Dmitrio
7 posts
Message posted at 11/13/2011, 16:56:59 PM by Dmitrio


If you work in PS only maybe PSD is faster and better compressed. If you want to use other programs for processing too like DXO or LR plugins than TIFF is more convenient workflow.


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Diavata
530 posts
Message posted at 11/13/2011, 18:10:47 PM by Diavata

Originally posted by Red:
Quoted Message: There is no difference in quality between the layered PSD and a layered TIFF file, they are both lossless formats, no image data is lost or changed.




That's what I always thought too and I agree that's what is says everywhere. But I worked on a certain PDS file (as website layout, to be precize) for a long time and at some point (after saving it many times) I noticed the images were pixelized. I still had the originals, incl. the first PDS file I saved (I usually work with different files, so they don't get too big. I.e. at some point, I copy and merge all layers to a new file and continue from there)



Anyway... when compairing the last file with the first one, the difference was huge. That's when I started to work with Tiffs. They indeed are bigger, but at least I can safe them as often as I want, without data loss.
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Parkinsonsniper
1091 posts
72
Message posted at 11/21/2011, 11:19:34 AM by Parkinsonsniper
If you are using photoshop and will not save the hundreds of time...you won't see any difference between .tif or .psd. I prefer .psd, but I take what Diavata says into account too. As s/he says that there is loss of quality, maybe there is. But as far as I know, .psd is a lossless format, just like .tiff. As I mentioned, it doesn't matter if you are not going to save it hundreds of time. Pick one and go with it...
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Diavata
530 posts
Message posted at 11/21/2011, 14:33:55 PM by Diavata

Originally posted by Parkinsonsniper:
Quoted Message: If you are using photoshop and will not save the hundreds of time...you won`t see any difference between .tif or .psd. I prefer .psd, but I take what Diavata says into account too. As s/he says that there is loss of quality, maybe there is. But as far as I know, .psd is a lossless format, just like .tiff. As I mentioned, it doesn`t matter if you are not going to save it hundreds of time. Pick one and go with it...




I agree, I did not notice it until I saved it many times, since it was a banner for a website layout I was working on.
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Viridana
14 posts
73
Message posted at 05/17/2012, 06:55:52 AM by Viridana
If I save a file as a psd then I wont be able to open it in camera raw again. If I save it in tif then I could open it into camera raw once again.

Interesting but the only useful thing I discovered with this was the ability to use the noise reduction in camera raw which I find very good to use.

If anyone more experienced would have any comments on this I would be happy to learn because I to have thought about the diffrence between tif and psd.


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Parkinsonsniper
1091 posts
72
Message posted at 08/29/2012, 03:28:24 AM by Parkinsonsniper
@Viridana what you say is pretty interesting and ridicolous (the ridicolous part is Adobe, not supporting his own file format :)) not your words) I'll go check it now. I think the cause might be layers...anyway. I'll be back in a couple of hours :)
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Parkinsonsniper
1091 posts
72
Message posted at 08/29/2012, 04:53:53 AM by Parkinsonsniper
I checked it...if the tiff file have layers (even a single layer) it is not possible to open it in ACR. You can open the tiff file in ACR only if you save it by using the discard layers option. On the other hand, psd files don't have a "discard layers" option, even if you flatten the image into a "background" layer and save it; ACR cannot handle the file. Very very ridicolous and very interesting...I used a non-transparent file. Adobe should seriously consider about this! :)) You catched a good point...
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Message posted at 10/26/2012, 04:17:13 AM by Nancyfromafrica
psd is the format to go for though the file size will be large but you will be able to edit the file in photoshop along with its layers and other information like layer properties
I don't have a camera but an iphone and a old nokia mobile f...

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