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Is Sony RX 100 good for Microstock?

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Libux77
408 posts
69
Message posted at 11/15/2012, 16:50:14 PM by Libux77
I wonder if the new sony rx100 can be a good as camera for microstock. Does anyone have some shots to show me.

Thanks in advance


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Brmonico
149 posts
73
Message posted at 11/16/2012, 08:38:27 AM by Brmonico
If you want to work in microstock, buy a SLR....not a toy! If you like this and you are a good learner you have to buy a SLR soon or later. That is a beautiful camera to take images for your family, many of them you can submit to stock agencies, and some ones will be acceptable . But in some agencies you will be block, not for quality but for the camera. That kind of cameras can produce good images when light conditions are very good too, but is only that they do.

You have canon and nikon with very affordable models that will put your images in another rank, you can invest in lenses and light illumination and you can learn and explore photography. I will point you to nikon 3100 , is an excellent start for price, with a beautiful dynamic range .

Best regards.
Nikon D7000 , Multiblitz studio light, Bowens studio light,

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Nospmisk
364 posts
61
Message posted at 11/16/2012, 08:57:03 AM by Nospmisk
Read the review here: Clicky
Canon Body, Sigma Glass, Canon Strobes, Adobe Creative Cloud

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Bogdanzagan
288 posts
78
Message posted at 11/16/2012, 12:40:02 PM by Bogdanzagan
I guess it is a very capable camera. With a SLR you will have to deal with lots of lenses and small DOF... while stock photography is almost everything in focus. I'm about to sell my dslr and buy a small RX100... but for now I'll just wait for a while.
Photography I use Nikon 105mm F2.8G, Nikon 35mm F1.8G, Nikon...

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Brmonico
149 posts
73
Message edited at 11/16/2012, 13:25:51 PM by Brmonico

Originally posted by Bogdanzagan:
Quoted Message: I guess it is a very capable camera. With a SLR you will have to deal with lots of lenses and small DOF... while stock photography is almost everything in focus. I`m about to sell my dslr and buy a small RX100... but for now I`ll just wait for a while.


What DOF have to do with point & shoot´s cameras or SLR´s ??? What you must say is that people need to know how focus work, need to know something about photography....

A point and shoot like a RX100 have lenses too, and apertures, what that camera have is a auto-programing scene to do the best possible pre-programed scene. But as a photographer what i need less is program teaching me how do take pictures.

The thing i love in Leica´s is just that...they just have what i need to take a picture, no more, no less.....

Maybe you should learn more about aperture and how the relation aperture/zoom work the DOF. This is not a SLR problem.

I could take an hour and say here all the main differences between a SLR and a point and shoot but i think this is not the place and i think that the hole between the two is so big that excuse comments .

I start to work with a Bronica camera and that camera only do 2 things...set the speed and shoot! Aperture whas set in lenses, the filme we pull by hand, focus was in lenses and manual. OOH the camera have a viewfinder too, but for the light condition we use the head or the flash/photometer. I still think that is the way....
Nikon D7000 , Multiblitz studio light, Bowens studio light,

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Bogdanzagan
288 posts
78
Message posted at 11/16/2012, 14:03:05 PM by Bogdanzagan
I agree, I have to read more about DOF... in the mean time take a look at this photo. It is made of a few stacked several photos... guess why. And it has a magnification of 3:1. And I took the shoot :)

   Mosquito   

Or even this ant that was eating a fallen plum... only 3.6:1 magnification one photo different angle.

   Red ant - High magnification   

What do you think? Should I read more about DOF?

And still I'm thinking of selling my dslr, tired of changing lenses.
Photography I use Nikon 105mm F2.8G, Nikon 35mm F1.8G, Nikon...

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Mike2focus
452 posts
74
Message posted at 11/16/2012, 16:22:05 PM by Mike2focus
Wow, Bogdanzagan, that mosquito macro shot is totally awesome!! Looks like you have macro photography down to a science.

And, Bruno, you give some excellent advice! Thanks for taking the time to write that much info.
Nikon, Adobe and Macintosh

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Brmonico
149 posts
73
Message posted at 11/16/2012, 16:34:46 PM by Brmonico
i say that you will not have more dof if you change camera, what you need change is the aperture or get a more strong flash to shoot this at f11/16 or a camera with better iso performance to shoot at 800/100 iso without noise and certainly is not a point and shoot camera, that is the main subject in this topic.

Your photos are great, i am talked about your comment. The fact you have great images here is not motive to know all about photography. We , all of us, are have to do a constant learning. DOF is about aperture and to get F16 aperture to focus all the subject you need more and better light, a camera with an excellent high iso performance. Is not a point and shoot camera, you and the user who start the topic will loose money.

I not mentioned that comment to say you are a bad photographer i just say that you must control the right technique to get the right DOF , is not changing camera. If you buy this camera you will problems like difficulty to focus when is need, difficulty in choose the point of focus, shoot delay, small censor, worse iso performance, worse low light performance, worse zoom because you need click the button , limited to lenses speed in zoom and to choose the right distance, focus will be useless in macro to take animals in movement and you don´t get manual focus....so, is not the camera. With that money buy a Tamrom 90mm macro 1:1 and shoot.

You are not bad photographer, you have great images but is not shame admit that you can have the wrong thought here. DOF is commanded in aperture , so choose the right aperture and focus your work and illumination on that. A good combination (speed+iso+light+lense) is the way to improve your work, not an consumer point and shoot camera.

Nikon D7000 , Multiblitz studio light, Bowens studio light,

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Bogdanzagan
288 posts
78
Message posted at 11/16/2012, 16:59:42 PM by Bogdanzagan
Ok, I will take your advice. Thank you for your nice words Brmonico, you're a great teacher.

But I will still exchange my big and chunky DSQL with this 200grams pocket take it anywhere really small camera that it's priced at the same price like a good ultrawide lens.

Photography I use Nikon 105mm F2.8G, Nikon 35mm F1.8G, Nikon...

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Message posted at 11/23/2012, 04:47:47 AM by Nancyfromafrica
seeing the above image i think it looks like a great camera for microshots it has lots of megapixels but the zoom quality is a bit low
I don't have a camera but an iphone and a old nokia mobile f...

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Bradcalkins
2544 posts
84
Message posted at 11/23/2012, 18:25:24 PM by Bradcalkins
It depends on what you shoot. If you do a lot of studio or macro work it isn't the best choice. On the other hand it would be excellent for travel and grab shots if you wouldn't normally chose a larger camera to take with you.

I've got 50 shots from a Canon G12 P&S that have a total of 157 sales... Most are shots I wouldn't have at all if it wasn't a smaller camera.
Olympus OM-D EM-1: 12-40mm f/2.8, 75mm f1.8, 25mm f1.4, 50-2...

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Bogdanzagan
288 posts
78
Message posted at 11/24/2012, 03:34:52 AM by Bogdanzagan
I agree, it's a good to have camera. It's ok also for studio work, you can use manual flashes optically triggered but I have to agree, not serious studio work. For macro you can attach a raynox to it.

I reached the conclusion that CGI sales better so I give less attention to photography and more to vectors, that's why I'm thinking of switching my dslr with a compact like this. I do not shoot events :)
Photography I use Nikon 105mm F2.8G, Nikon 35mm F1.8G, Nikon...

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Gumshoe
8 posts
Message posted at 11/24/2012, 03:39:28 AM by Gumshoe
I used to use a Nikon D90, but got fed up carrying the weight. I've moved to micro 4/3 system. The Olympus EPL-1 produces wonderful images - in my opinion as good as the D90. I'm sure to get some arguments against that, but Dreamstime certainly approves the camera.
Olympus E-P1 Olympus E-PL1 14-42mm zoom lens 17mm pancake...

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Bradcalkins
2544 posts
84
Message edited at 11/29/2012, 23:56:30 PM by Bradcalkins
While it won't compete with a larger sensor camera in many areas, it is certainly impressive image quality for its size. Check out this full quality 24MP jpg from DPReview...
Olympus OM-D EM-1: 12-40mm f/2.8, 75mm f1.8, 25mm f1.4, 50-2...

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Parkinsonsniper
1093 posts
72
Message edited at 11/30/2012, 03:36:11 AM by Parkinsonsniper

Originally posted by Brmonico:
Quoted Message: What DOF have to do with point & shoot´s cameras or SLR´s ??? What you must say is that people need to know how focus work, need to know something about photography....A point and shoot like a RX100 have lenses too, and apertures, what that camera have is a auto-programing scene to do the best possible pre-programed scene. But as a photographer what i need less is program teaching me how do take pictures.The thing i love in Leica´s is just that...they just have what i need to take a picture, no more, no less.....Maybe you should learn more about aperture and how the relation aperture/zoom work the DOF. This is not a SLR problem.I could take an hour and say here all the main differences between a SLR and a point and shoot but i think this is not the place and i think that the hole between the two is so big that excuse comments .I start to work with a Bronica camera and that camera only do 2 things...set the speed and shoot! Aperture whas set in lenses, the filme we pull by hand, focus was in lenses and manual. OOH the camera have a viewfinder too, but for the light condition we use the head or the flash/photometer. I still think that is the way....


Hey hey...wait!

"What DOF have to do with point & shoot´s cameras or SLR´s ??? What you must say is that people need to know how focus work, need to know something about photography...."

A dslr and a Point and Shoot camera have a LOT of difference in terms of DOF. Bigger sensor have much much more DoF than a smaller sensor. Bogdanzagan is very right about what he says. Point and shoot cameras with small sensor have a great advantage in terms of depth of field. You don't have to set a small aperture to get everything in focus. Diffraction is serous limit in larger sensor cameras and there is no way to get over it. It was deeply discussed in another thread in DT's forum. Here, I can tell about the crop factor and effects of focal lenght on DoF...and why PS cameras have larger depth of field, but it's not the right place. Please do not misinform people. This is a serious and professional photography forum. I don't know why noone corrected this information, I think they just didn't read that post.

As an answer to the main question...I checked for the camera mentioned and I think the only problem will be noise and dynamic range. If you can take shots with good light, in the base ISO, you won't have any problems. 20 mp is big enough to crop or downsize the picture. But you should check for the zoom quality too. I mean, if the image quality is decreased when zoomed in, it won't work for you. Such PS cameras are mostly build to be used in wide angle and largest aperture, because they are made for amateur photographers. But using the widest angle won't always work in people or object photos.

Maybe you should go for a micro four thirds camera, they are very close to DSLR quality. I have a Nikon D300 with prime lenses and an Olympus e-pm1 with a kit lens. Olympus is not the same as my D300, but it's very close. It has a flash shoe, which will let you use wireless triggers or flashguns. Sony doesn't have any opportunity to use bigger light sources. Also, a MF Thirds camera will have a larger DoF and will let you use a wide variety of lenses, including dslr lenses (using converters).

Good luck :)
- 2x Nikon D300 - Olympus e-PM1 - Nikkor 20mm f2.8 ...

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Brmonico
149 posts
73
Message edited at 11/30/2012, 06:36:59 AM by Brmonico
Hey, easy there. i am not misinform anyone and i´m a serious person . DOF is very complicated to understand and is directely related with focal lenses/sensor sizes .


The main question of this topic is about using a point and shoot to stock. So , stock is all about quality and all in focus. In quality field he will always loose. Quantity of px in not quality in al cases . Small sensor and smaller px to stock photography are always a step back. And this is for stock....With that money he can spend less and get more. If people only want a p&s to easy carry and make some good images ON great light conditions is another thing !


I told how he can control DOF with the system he have . NOT how dof is related to sensor sizes and my english not allow me write this with all terms. But for information we can see in a very quick steep this:

First comparison - The same prime 50mm in full frame and aps-c :


Full frame- You will have a 50mm point of view with a Dof value of 1.0 DOF . In aps-c you will have a 1,6x crop or 1,6x dof that will give you a value of 0,6 DOF . So if you compare 100% crops (thats the factor we use in stock) the full frame will give always more dof with the same focal distance. If you have a aps-c how you can get more dof?

- Easy, you must use a 31,25mm focal or 30mm lenses , or 35mm lenses. Lets compare, here we use 50mm on Full frame and the focal distant in aps-c 31.25x1,6 crop that is same point of view that 50mm in FF. the final value of Dof will be the same 1.0 for full frame and 1,9 for aps-c because we use the same point of view but one sensor is smaller.

Point and shoots:
They have a truly smaller sensor, a highest crop factor to FF focal distance and the lenses that come with that cameras are prepared to give the point of view with sensor crop factor, so you have a truly smaller sensor and a real crop factor in point of view that give the highest dof number . BUT if it was possible we put the same 50mm prime in this sensor this will loose dof a lots .

. If you have only one prime 35mm and need all in focus just close the aperture and guarantee the minimal distant to main subject. A 35mm in aps-c will focus to infinite (all in focus ) from +/- 0,5 m to infinite in you shoot more that F8/F11. Not in f2.8 , so just close the aperture and choose the a good distance from main subject .

street and quick photography, so you can put the 35mm lenses in manual focus, set the aperture to f11 minimal and turne the focus ring to infinite. If you shoot 2m distante from subjects you don´t need to focus because you are always in focus. Don´t need a p&s to do that, fast and easy , simple shoot .

My walk around lense in a AI-s nikkor 24mm manual focus.....i don´t need autofocus in this lense. 0,3m to infinite, f/8 is all in focus . I have my focus ring in infinite , so i simple shoot. There is not any more fast auto focus in world than this....

DOF , Like i said first, is not a camera problem

Resume:

-same lense or same focal distante VS different sensor - The biggest sensor have mor DOF because the smaller will increase the point of view. Don´t mess focal distance with point of view. A 50mm prime is always a 50mm prime in all sensor sizes. What changes is the point view. On aps-c a 50mm still is a 50mm what you get is 75mm point of view. (crop factor)

-Same point of view using different focal lenses .crop factor will give same point of view in booth sensors with different primes (50mm and 30mm )- small sensor have more DOF at same point of view

- Secret of Point and shoot. They have the smallest sensor sizes but their lenses are prepair to give the same point of view of a full frame 1.0 dof. But they always loose in image quality.

All this can be controled using the right focal distance combined with right aperture
Nikon D7000 , Multiblitz studio light, Bowens studio light,

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Parkinsonsniper
1093 posts
72
Message edited at 11/30/2012, 06:20:38 AM by Parkinsonsniper
Ok you know what is DoF and sensor size's effects etc,

But when you say these;

"i say that you will not have more dof if you change camera"
"What DOF have to do with point & shoot´s cameras or SLR´s"

most people will think that point-shoots and DSLR's create the same depth of field, which is wrong.

Cause if you change your DSLR camera to a smaller sensor PS camera, you will have more DoF. Which means changing cameras will effect depth of field...and DoF have a lot of things to do with point-shoot / DSLR cameras. Yes you can control DoF using aperture, we all know that. But changing your dslr with a compact camera will bring you more depth of field. We cannot say that DOF will not change. It will change, dramatically. I mean Bogdanzagan is right when he makes that DoF comparaison.

Ok please let's do not argue about this subject here, I don't want to mess the thread about Sony RX100. I just wanted to prevent a misunderstanding / misinformation of other members, who will read and learn from this thread.
- 2x Nikon D300 - Olympus e-PM1 - Nikkor 20mm f2.8 ...

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Bradcalkins
2544 posts
84
Message posted at 11/30/2012, 12:04:02 PM by Bradcalkins

Originally posted by :
Quoted Message: Cause if you change your DSLR camera to a smaller sensor PS camera, you will have more DoF.


That is just false, I'm with BRMonico. The only reason you have 'more' DOF is because you are shooting at the same f/number as on a larger sensor camera. Nothing stops you from shooting stopped down with a dSLR and matching the DOF of the smaller sensor camera. Of course, you may have to bump up ISO or drop your shutter speed, but you have a larger sensor to compensate for the difference in ISO, and outdoors where there is light and the compact is at its best you won't have to sacrifice ISO on the larger sensor either. There are lots of reasons to choose a smaller format system (and I'm someone who has made that choice to gain the advantage of always having a better camera with me), but deeper DOF shouldn't be one of them. There are very small sensor cameras that can be stopped down to say, f/8, and the equivalent may be beyond what you can set a larger format lens to, but if you think that a Canon S110 at the extreme end of its telephoto range at f/8 is going to give you a really sharp image with lots of DOF, think again.

I can set my MFT OM-D with 75mm f/1.8 lens to f/22, and theoretically have a DOF advantage over full frame since few 135mm full frame lenses go to f/45, but practically there is no gain as diffraction has robbed too much sharpness by f/22 to be critically sharp anyways.

Take a look at the following graph: Equivalent apertures for various compact sensors Note that not one of them goes outside the range you could set a large sensor camera / lens to.

The 'gain' in DOF is only because people and program modes tend to favor larger f/numbers, not because a small sensor offers any particular advantage in deep DOF.
Olympus OM-D EM-1: 12-40mm f/2.8, 75mm f1.8, 25mm f1.4, 50-2...

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Parkinsonsniper
1093 posts
72
Message posted at 11/30/2012, 13:00:33 PM by Parkinsonsniper
Okay :))) you are right...
- 2x Nikon D300 - Olympus e-PM1 - Nikkor 20mm f2.8 ...

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Brmonico
149 posts
73
Message edited at 11/30/2012, 13:36:09 PM by Brmonico
Yes , Brad , that´s the point. Thanks.

With a slr you can do everything and everything is better. What you must have is the necessary skills for that. P&S only solve the problem fast with programs and cheap solutions, but at the end is only this that your file will have. And pixeis are only pixeis . They can made a P&S with 80mp , the only thing it will have is a larger file and a more dark sensor. The pixel is like a glass of water. In the same size sensor to put more pixeis they have to be smaller. And like a glass of water if it is smaller is more dificult to put water, or light in this case. A large file and good images at stunning/easy light conditions is the best you get. The rest is always very difficult or impossible to get.

To finish : I know you will do some excellent files with that and you can even crop them to get more sharp and some of them will be accepted,but, in 90% of use you will loose a lots of images. Not for your own use but for stock use. You will have an huge disadvantage. You can Spend less money and buy a slr. You have all your life to learn photography.

if it´s only for fun, that´s ok.

For last: Consider a Fuji X100, i know thats only 12mp, right? Wrong, is all you have in this sony with great image capabilities . Amazing quality files and skin tones. why? Is 12mp on a aps-c sensor. D700 only 12mp too and the image still is outstanding after these years . Big pixeis !
Nikon D7000 , Multiblitz studio light, Bowens studio light,

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