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new to this - prints?

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Message posted at 11/24/2012, 17:35:36 PM by Rebeccajelley
Hi, So I have found the picture I want, then realise on this site its down loads and they dont print and send the pic to you. So I need to purchase and down load from here and upload to another company to get my required print size on nice glossy finished paper.
Now I want a large print about 30" by 20", do I need to purchase that approx size from this site? Or do I purchase a smaller image and the company that are doing the print I pay them to enlarge it as well?


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Jeyaprakash84
215 posts
70
Message edited at 11/24/2012, 19:47:04 PM by Jeyaprakash84
I do not have any experience in printing. But, the simple fact that I know is, up scaling (enlarging) will end up in the loss of quality which would be visible when you print large. So, it is better to get a large version of the photo you have selected. For printing the size you require, you may need 12 megapixel for good quality and around 14 megapixel for the best quality. Hope to see some expert comments also to confirm the file size you require...

Canon EOS 1100D, 18-55mm III, 50mm f/1.8 II, Canon 80-200mm ...

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Lauriey
364 posts
81
Message posted at 11/25/2012, 00:45:11 AM by Lauriey
Snapfish suggests 2700x1800 pixels, which is just a tad bit more then the large download here, so by their standards it would be best to get the extra large. Snapfish is a consumer lab though, and probably doesn't expect it's clients to be as picky... I like to keep at least 250 DPI, which would be 5000x7500 pixels.

If you look at the buying page it actually gives you the sizes each size will print at with 300 DPI (best printing), however even the extra large option doesn't cover that...

"Extra large2495x3493px (806 KB)8.3" x 11.6" @300 dpi"


That said, the larger the image is, the lower the DPI needs to be. This is because the larger the image is the further you must be from it to see it all! If you're looking at a small image it might be in your hand and closer to your face... while a larger print on the wall you would stand back to look at. Unless you are pixel peeping (examine it up close) it doesn't need to be a super sharp. Billboards are printed from the same files large wall prints are.

I would say your best bet would be to download the largest size... this would insure the best quality print, especially when printing at a 20x30.
D700, 14-24mm, 24-70mm 2.8, 70-200mm VRII, 50mm 1.4, 105mm M...

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Bogdanzagan
288 posts
78
Message posted at 11/25/2012, 03:20:34 AM by Bogdanzagan
You can easily search for the similar content and then arrange the results "Sort by: Largest First". I.m sure you will find an artwork big enough to fulfill your printing requirements.
Photography I use Nikon 105mm F2.8G, Nikon 35mm F1.8G, Nikon...

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Message posted at 11/25/2012, 06:51:27 AM by Rebeccajelley
Thanks for replies Lauriey, you answered my question. It needs to be of a good quality as I am using the picture as a wall display in an antique frame - so who ever is observing it their eye will be drawn to the centre of the picture.

I have a high mega pix camera and normally just get my own pictures printed, however in this circumstance I have lost the original and was desperate to have THAT particular image - I managed to find it on this site - even from the exact angle I had taken it from! But I just don't understand the tech jargon!

Thank you for your help


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