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Do You Use a Green Screen and Software?

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Wisconsinart
1526 posts
80
Message posted at 03/30/2013, 07:24:01 AM by Wisconsinart
When I shoot an object to be isolated I will use a white background. Works fine if the final background is white after isolating the object.

However, if you drop the object into a scene then you have a white edge, even if you feathered, etc. Pain in the butt!

Does a green screen work well for this? Or do you still end up with a green edge and still have to process?

There are different packages of software out there, any recommendations?

Or does Photoshop work just fine for removing a sing;e color and all you need is a green backdrop?

Is there a better method altogether?

Thanks for any sage experience.
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Matthiase
466 posts
70
Message edited at 03/30/2013, 11:47:52 AM by Matthiase - member is an admin

Originally posted by Wisconsinart:
Quoted Message: When I shoot an object to be isolated I will use a white background. Works fine if the final background is white after isolating the object.However, if you drop the object into a scene then you have a white edge, even if you feathered, etc. Pain in the butt!Does a green screen work well for this? Or do you still end up with a green edge and still have to process?There are different packages of software out there, any recommendations?Or does Photoshop work just fine for removing a sing;e color and all you need is a green backdrop?Is there a better method altogether?Thanks for any sage experience.


I use a white background, usually a white paper. And i just a flash. When i import the image to lightroom and just pump up the whites and the background become perfectly white.

If that dosnt do the trick i clean up the rest in photoshop with the patch and healing tool :)
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Miraclemoments
1197 posts
72
Message posted at 03/30/2013, 14:29:19 PM by Miraclemoments
What I have found to work when doing this is to zoom in at about 300% and start blending the edges if the object was on white. I use a brush that just just gives me an edge blur when blending. Each scene/subject differs.

I do believe a green screen would work better though. It is always easier to edit that way instead of with a white background. I have not used anything better than photoshop yet?
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Debramillet
268 posts
68
Message posted at 03/30/2013, 16:54:39 PM by Debramillet
i heard a long time ago that that type of green is used only because its a rarly used color and less liklely to blend with any colors likely being used making background removal easier


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Red
1671 posts
Message edited at 03/31/2013, 08:50:26 AM by Red
Word on the street has it that shooting on green is best left for video. You need some intense and extremely even background lighting and you need to move your subject or person a good distance from the backdrop to prevent a green cast in the shadows. A white background hides uneven lighting. I use a cool photoshop action to remove a white (or black) background that works great called Transparent Channels. It works with CS5 and you can download it from several sites such as How To Geek

That being said, I was taught that it was best to shoot anything that needed to be knocked out on a gray background, not white. I used a medium gray roll of paper when I was doing product photography for a living. I used some pretty intense lighting from the top and both sides to control the shadows and seldom got an unnatural cast. If there was a color cast left around or on the subject, gray was natural and easy to adjust with the photoshop "replace color" menu or the hue saturation slider via a mask. I can't speak to people photos though, I only did head shots for company use on colored backgrounds and used strobes, no knock-outs.

I ran across a program called PhotoKey that you can try for free that talks about the whole green screen thing but the video goes on about how to remove a green cast. Why make more work than needed? I would think it would be easier to adjust a gray cast from gray paper than a green cast from green paper. I'm a bit old-school though so the green screen thing sounds interesting.


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68
Message posted at 03/31/2013, 01:14:28 AM by Robinstockphotos
I'm not sure about the green screen thing but blending things into backgrounds of other colors is rather easy in Photoshop. I usually blur out a copy of background layer and use a brush to put the blurred edges lightly on that white outline. The radius of blur depends on the distance of the color of major influence. That works most of the time. There are many photos in my port where I used the same thing isolated against white against many different backgrounds.
The process takes 2-3 minutes.
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Parkinsonsniper
1091 posts
72
Message edited at 04/04/2013, 06:32:26 AM by Parkinsonsniper
@Red I jumped on the action you mentioned and tried it, but it just removes everything. I mean every light part of the image even it is obviously in the object and I used already isolated images, they were already perfectly on white background. Since you use it and I trust your experience, I think I missed an important part. Anyway, it was fun to try it :)

I heard and tried some softwares but they all have problems and most of them have the problem at the same part with you, the white and black edges.

I use my masking technique that I shared it here on DT as a blog. It is very simple and fast. Since it's totally manual, you can always grab the tools and correct the mistakes. I generally don't need, but if I need to get rid of the white you mention, I use the refine edge tool and shrink the selection as needed. It cleans those whites, not perfectly but does very decent job.

Here is my blog :) enjoy
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Red
1671 posts
Message posted at 04/04/2013, 07:06:13 AM by Red
Wow, someone listened. Lighting is the key and it takes the perfect set-up. I used 3 or 4 lights and bounce cards in strategic places. Also, shooting on gray was the fastest way to go for me when I had to photograph 20 or 30 products a day, kind of like an assembly line because I didn't have to fiddle with my exposure compensation - default settings worked best straight out of the camera with gray. Gray gave me an overall softer neutral than white did and I could control the contrast better and do less photoshop work. I was fortunate to be able to set up my shooting area and leave it that way and I worked with pretty intense strobes.

I found that shooting a product on a gray background eliminated all color casts and made it very easy to knock out. White often bounced too much light on the light areas and I had to take more shots to get the best one. If lit well, there was still a very defined edge which was easier to clip or mask. I had to knock-out many of the products with a clipping path (for catalog print production). I did start doing this with film though and had less time to get it right. Digital is another story, I love that you can take loads of pics in a short amount of time just for testing, a luxury I didn't have many years ago. Shooting on gray doesn't work for everyone but I'm thrilled that you gave it a try.


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Message posted at 04/12/2013, 04:12:40 AM by Robinstockphotos
Yeah, gray background works just fine. Try blurring out the new background and apply a mask with the blurred background on top of the isolated thing. Then draw the edges using a brush of 15% opacity. That's all it takes and nobody can ever tell you shot the isolated thing on white background.
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