10 Things I Have Learned About Photography

1. The LCD screen on the back of a camera is not always accurate. (Many times that shot looks decent, only to find out it is blurry on a larger screen.)

2. If you want a sharp photo, you need to use a good tripod. (You never realize just how shaky your body/arms can be until you need that still shot)

3. Study what you like and don’t like about your photos. (If you take time every time you download your photos to look at the likes and dislikes, you can improve on the next shot)

4. Sometimes the unexpected shot is better than the planned. (Shoot often and don’t worry about having everything placed “just right” sometimes the unposed shots are better than the posed. But take the posed shots too, just in case.)

5. Be flexible. (What you envision in your mind is not always what you can achieve. Work with what you have and make the best of the situation. If you can be creative and flexible you may get a better shot than you originally thought)

6. Accept criticism openly - and with a grain of salt. (Allow your photographs to be critiqued, sometimes others have insights that can help you - but keep in mind everyone’s opinion is different and just because someone disagrees with you doesn’t mean you are wrong, or even that they are right. Accept the criticism, then decide to use it, or not.)

7. Post-processing software can be a great teacher. (In the beginning it may help you create better photos than what came out of the camera. After a while, if you are always fixing the same thing, you will know what to improve on before you take the shot.)

© Patl ( Help)
8. Enjoy it. (Don’t shoot when you are frustrated or angry, it will show in your photos - and you won’t have fun, either. If you are relaxed and enjoying what you are doing, that will show in your photos as well.)

9. Take time to shoot, if you have it. (If you can set up your shot, do it. Take the time to look around and try out different angles or shots. If you don’t have the time, take the shot anyway and hope for the best. You never know when you will end up with the “lucky shot”. Just don’t be disappointed if you don’t get it. Know you did all you could to get what you got.)

10. People who have that “one-in-a-million” shot probably have just that. (Don’t be discouraged when you see the great shots others took if you have a bunch of “bad” ones. They most likely took the million shots to get the one great one. The photographer sees the million shots in the trash, the viewers only see the ones the photographer deems good enough to share.) This one was the most valuable lesson for me. I would get disappointed when my photos weren’t turning out “amazing” every time with the effort I put into them. But, as I thought about it, no one brags about their “bad” shots. So, I keep practicing and shooting away, knowing that somewhere in the bunch will be that “keeper”.

Question : What did you learn about photography over the last few months?

Photo credits: IbanMontero, Pakhnyushchyy, Pat Lalli, Suzanne Tucker.

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