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Bridge fetish or a lesson in composition? You decide!

I've got a confession to make: I've got a bridge fetish. I find the lined interior and exterior of bridges irresistible, and I always have an overwhelming urge to photograph, dissect and digest them during my travels.

Take for example the Helix Bridge at the Marina Bay Waterfront in Singapore, quite possibly the earliest bridge photo in my portfolio. Don't you find the entire structure fascinating, especially the attempt of the architects and builders to model this after the double helix structure found in DNA? The passing woman-in-red made this image the perfect, especially after I cropped it at 4:5 aspect ratio.

These two different points-of-view of the same dilapidated wooden bridge at Datai Beach, Langkawi, Malaysia, are the run-of-the-mill bridge shots, featuring diagonals. However, the second one made me realize that the undercarriage of a bridge could be interesting too!

I've taken the Helix Bridge again to illustrate how a strong diagonal, especially one that literally starts from the side, could be used to introduce the viewer to the rest of the image, plunging into his eye into the middle and subsequently allowing him to widen his gaze to the rest of the frame.

Taking a break from the Helix Bridge, let's take a look at the Kelong Bridge, found at the Punggol Waterway in Singapore. Giving the viewer a sense of architectural surrealism reminiscent of poles-that-stick-out, the designers had meant to evoke memories of remnants of the fishing villages of the past in Punggol town, a part of historical Singapore.

Together with its counterpart the Sunrise Bridge (also found in the Punggol Waterway), both bridges now become part of the landscape (together with the skies and water) for each image.

I'd be remiss not to feature this one. Makes the viewer as if he was in a spider web, going to be drawn deep into the middle, to be devoured by the spider!

And finally, dear reader, I bounce you back to my perennial favorite, and two versions of it, for your quiet contemplation.

Oops, I lied. Here's the last one, I promise :)

Photo credits: Tangjans.

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August 21, 2012

Psmpics

I love bridges too, especially walking the Brooklyn and the Golden Gate bridges. Thanks for posting your spectacular shots!

August 21, 2012

Egomezta

As a civil engineer I also find bridges irresistible.... Great images.

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