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Euphoric about photos - Interview with Photoeuphoria

Photoeuphoria joined our community in 2004 and has managed to build an impressive portfolio while maintaining a fresh approach to concepts and photography in general. When she started this business, she was "a single stay at home mother of three amazing kids, who got lucky with a camera one afternoon and stumbled into a fairytale". And what a fairytale her portfolio is. Featured photographer between December 27, 2004 and January 3, 2005, she is one of our oldest contributors whose constant activity and style is an inspiration to many, always sending a powerful message to photo veterans and newbies alike: "If you want to see beauty in all that life has to offer, view it through the eyes of a photographer. If you want to see perfection... buy Photoshop" (Jaimie Duplass).

Here's what she shared with us on photography, photos and life:

You have been with us for a long time, since the very beginning, how do you feel about this whole experience, looking back a bit?

I believe Dreamstime has always been one of the more stable and dependable micro stock companies. You get out of it exactly what you put into it and I really appreciate that.

How would you describe your photographic style?

I have my assembly line stock side and my want to be a real photographer side. They battle each other... I wake up in the morning and ask myself if I want to make money today or if I want to make people say "WOW".

You obviously have a way with people. How do you get models, who aren't family, to be so candid in front of the camera?

People ask me this all the time but I am not really sure what to say. Either I have gotten really lucky and found some truly amazing models or I am the least intimidating person in the world. Not sure which. I do find that people were a lot more uptight when I was shooting in a real studio than they are now that I am shooting in my garage. Maybe it is the work at home environment that puts them at ease.

Share an embarrassing/funny moment from a photo shoot.

Embarrassing to me is when I lose my camera during a shoot. Which I do a lot. I wander off, put it down, and cannot find it. Once it went missing for up to twenty minutes. I suggested a complete wardrobe change to the model to buy time, excused myself from the studio, and gathered my entire family to "quietly" hunt down my camera for me. Apparently, I went to the pantry for a bottle of water and set it down inside.

What process do you go through when setting up for a shoot in terms of styling, lighting and location?

In studio, I try to get as even a light as possible throughout the entire space. If you want children to be candid, you cannot limit them to one small section of an 8x8 room. They need to move around and you need your f20 to go wherever they go.

What is, in your opinion, the most important characteristic / skill needed to become a successful microstock photographer?

The most important skill is to recognize that no matter what you shoot, someone is online searching for it right now. It is a huge world out there with so many stories to be told, stories that need images. So shoot everything. Finding a niche is great and rewarding and can really help boost your sales but do not limit yourself.

Is there a role model in photography for you? What about life?

My kids, all kids... kids remind me to always see things with a huge amount of imagination, no limitations and to trust in endless possibilities.

What's your secret photo accessory, the one that often makes the difference?

A homemade on camera flash bounce my sister made for me. I would be lost without it. I hate being tied to and limited by a sync cord but never liked what the flash added to the images until I got that crazy homemade on camera flash bounce.

Having so much experience, could you please share a tip or two on how to get things simpler? How to "lose" the things that don't really matter in an image? How to simplify the message?

It is easy to find the message when shooting with people. All you really need is the perfect expression. Everything else is clutter.

Let's say you did not find photography as hobby/profession. What else do you see yourself doing?

Farming World of Warcraft gold.

What is Photoeuphoria's life like?

When I began my career as a stock photographer, seven years ago, I was a single mother with three amazing kids. Now I am the mother of one amazing kid and two beautiful grown women. Thanks to this crazy industry and companies like Dreamstime, I spent every day of the past seven years at home with my children.

My business has grown as fast and as beautifully as my children over the past few years. I have upgraded cameras, cars, homes, traveled... and all with enough time left over to meet a wonderful man. We will be celebrating our one year anniversary this February.

I get a little sappy and overly excited when I think of what my life may have been like if I had not become a stock photographer... wow... I believe that I must be the luckiest and most successful photographer in the whole world. At least to my family. ;)

We would like to thank Jaimie Duplass of Photo Euphoria for taking the time to answer our questions and for the useful tips and wise words.

Photo credits: Photoeuphoria.

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January 31, 2012

Photoeuphoria

And I am curious, do you think any of your children will want to be a photographer one day?

They have each tried being on what I call "the fun side of the camera" but lost interest. My oldest is into writing fantasy novels. She has such an amazing imagination and a talent for words. My second has self taught herself Japanese and Korean and will be moving to Japan at the end of a year with the hope of becoming an independent translator... because there are not enough Japanese novels available in the US (her words). My son, loves being a goofball for the camera now and again but says he will only be a photographer if it means meeting girls. He is eight years old. I am in so much trouble!!! hehe Thank you for reading.

January 13, 2012

Kharyadi

Great interview. Thank you for the inspiration ^_^

January 13, 2012

Dmitrimaruta

Thanks! I get inspired by this article :)

January 11, 2012

Adeliepenguin

Great interview, thank you both. Jamie, I am in awe of what you have accomplished. I wish you continued successes. And I am curious, do you think any of your children will want to be a photographer one day?

January 11, 2012

Photoeuphoria

Thank you for reading and taking the time to leave such sweet comments!! :)

January 11, 2012

Onime

keep up your good work Jamie. That's great :)

January 11, 2012

19838623doug

Thanks to both of you. I enjoyed it very much.
Doug

January 11, 2012

Godfer

Jamie is a total inspiration....I don't know how she finds the time to work so hard and produce so much complex work that involves organization and planning and look after 3 children. She is amazing. Incredible work!!! Congrats!

January 11, 2012

Suemack

Jaimie, you are an inspiration!

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