Jpeg 8 or 16 bit?

Hello to all! I ask you a very simple but very useful information, do you think you can send the Jpeg 16-bit instead of 8 bit? The quality would be much higher! Thank you for your answers!

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November 02, 2013

Fallostupido

I don' remebrer where bit i' m sure that is better sRgb profile better for
Microstok images

November 02, 2013

FabioConcetta

Thank you.

November 01, 2013

Fallostupido

I don' remebrer where bit i' m sure that is better sRgb profile better for
Microstok images

October 30, 2013

FabioConcetta

Thank you for your participation, Igor and Alvera have placed another big question very interesting! Another question that I would like to make is how you set the color profile for your camera in sRGB or Adobe RGB? This I ask, then set the profile to Camera Raw with Prophoto or RGB. Sorry for the many questions ^ _ ^

October 30, 2013

Igordabari

But the big question is how DT can make a TIFF from a JPEG file

This is easy to do. The real big question is how perfect this TIFF is... :)

October 30, 2013

TMarchev

16bit have more colors.... but if source file is 24bit like TIFF or RAW. And on print no have a difference.

October 29, 2013

Hanbaoluan

Learn here, thanks for sharing!

October 29, 2013

Alvera

JPEG specifications: 8 Bits/Channel. Some medical devices work with 12 Bits/Channel but those jpegs are in grayscale. Bottom line: A jpeg file can not have 16 Bits/Channel. But the big question is how DT can make a TIFF from a JPEG file :) This is a well kept secret... :)

October 29, 2013

Wordplanet

The quality of your photos is lovely so I wouldn't worry about it, but I don't think that a jpeg can be saved in 16 bit - I think they are always compressed down to 8 bit even if you're starting with a 16 bit TIFF or other RAW file.

I'm right - check out this link:
http://blogs.adobe.com/jkost/2010/07/saving_16_bit_images_as_jpeg.html

October 29, 2013

Mike2focus

You can't save a 16-bit JPG out of Photoshop, it won't let you. Try it. Photoshop will throw a message at you something like "File must be saved as a copy with this selection" and then it will save the JPG at 8-bit. JPGs can only be saved at 8-bit. I wish they could be saved at 16-bit, because like Heywoody said, gradients and such look so much better at 16-bit.

October 29, 2013

Heywoody

I think the site only accept 8 bit but could be wrong. Where the naked eye can see the difference is where you have subtle colour graduation (e.g. certain skies) that look fine in 16 bit but can have horrible banding in 8 bit.

October 29, 2013

FabioConcetta

Some of you have loaded a 16-bit Jpeg? Dreamstime accept it?

October 29, 2013

FabioConcetta

Thank for sharing Lenuta ^_^

October 29, 2013

Lenutaidi

Hi, Concetta! Maybe this link is useful : http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tutorials/understanding-series/u-raw-files.shtml and this : http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/forums/thread9208.htm
Best regard,Lenuta!

October 29, 2013

FabioConcetta

Thanks for the answers, I explain my routine: I start from a raw format (Camera Raw) open (Photoshop) and work the image in 16-bit Tiff and Jpeg convert it to last, in this way the quality is ensured if the Jpeg was 16 and not 8-bit. I know that eye you do not see the difference, I thought 16-bit (best quality) I had more chance of selling to buyers.

October 29, 2013

Gheburaseye

Hi! There's no difference between 8 and 16 bits. I usually use gimp for creating jpeg and in this freeware there are not this difference. I read it on other software, like micrografx, but these are very old software.

October 29, 2013

Igordabari

Quality of the final image does not depend on 8/16 bit issue. For the final image 8 bits are quite enough. 16 bits are only needed to process photos.

October 29, 2013

Digikhmer

Technically speaking, I might be better. In the other hand, nobody will be able to make the distinction between 8bits and 16bits visually because our eyes can not see it :)

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