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Make people click on mobile ads, not click away

Happy people using mobile smart phone

You’re reading something online. An ad pops up. You furiously look for the cross to get rid of it. Sound familiar?

Your challenge should you wish to accept it: to make people forget about what they were reading and click on your ad.

How? Read on.

1.Do vegetarians secretly eat meat?

Of course not. Instead of trying to convert people to your way of thinking, target people who are already convinced.

Look at this.

Someone who loves a bargain will click on this. But if they see discounted products as being sub-standard, they won’t.

Don’t fall into the common trap of thinking you can create a desire that doesn’t already exist.

Identify your target audience before you do anything else. You need to know who will be interested in your ad so you can:

- Select the best places to advertise

- Use language your audience will understand

- Choose images that will engage

2.Don’t forget to KISS

Keep It Simple Stupid! I’m not calling you stupid.But KISS is a design principle you should pay attention to.

Look at this banner.

Does it need any more information? No. It could say ‘Buy your Father’s Day gift here’. But it doesn’t need it.

Here’s another example. It is specific. It could have read ‘Huge sale on now!’. But what is a huge sale? Aside from the company name, the reader doesn’t need to know much else.

Another thing.

Remember that time when you couldn’t find the cross to make an ad vanish? Don’t be that ad. I know you don’t want people to click on the cross. But you’ll only annoy them if they can’t. Make the cross easy to see and big enough to click.

3.We all love show, not tell

You have 1 second to make your audience want to click on your ad. Not on the cross.

If you’ve chosen the right target audience, then you are half-way there. But your next job is to appeal to them.

Take this picture.

It could read ‘Assorted ice cream flavours’. But it doesn’t need to. Because the image shows the assorted flavours. Show your audience the benefit of what you are offering, don’t tell them.

Speaking of benefits, your customer will want to know why they should buy your product. So, show them.

A feature is what your product or service can do. A benefit is what someone will get out of your product or service.

If you can show the benefits through a picture, you’ve hit the jackpot.

4.Why some people can’t read

Think of three electrical items in your bedroom.

You didn’t imagine a bullet-pointed list, did you? You probably imagined your bedroom and found these items in your imagined picture.

That’s how we think - visually.

So would your reader remember an ad if it was full of writing?

Find a picture, an infographic - something your audience can look at. Not necessarily read.

Of course, you can’t completely avoid words.

This is a great example of a banner that combines imagery and words. It’s easy to read. Easy to visualise. And there are no sentences. Just words. Good words.

5.The boring bit

But important.

Mobile devices come in all shapes and sizes. So do people. And so do websites.

As yourself:

-Will the ad be clear on different screen resolutions? E.g. a mobile phone, a tablet

-Can someone with poor eyesight still see what’s important?

-Does the size work with the website? E.g. social media sites have different size guides

-What if someone is colour blind?

Do your research.

Don’t stop here.

If you are serious about creating a high performing ad, then monitor its results. And respond.

Keep an eye on how well your ad is doing on different sites. Think about why some are performing better than others. Look at the demographics of the people clicking on your ad, versus those clicking on the cross. Try some A/B testing. If you don’t know what that is, look it up.

All this information is useful in adapting your designs to keep improving how well they perform.

Credits for photo's referenced: Alhovik, Kittipong Jirasukhanont, Trueffelpix

Photo credits: Kiosea39.

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