Shallow DOF for stock

One of my latest images just sold, and it occured to me that I have very few images with shallow depth of field as a key feature. In some closeups it is enevitable, but I rarely use it as a 'focus' of my stock images. There are a few reasons for this:

1. Lens are a little less than optimal at wide apertures, leading to potential rejections. Macro lenses (such as used in my cookie shot) are exceptions, but most fast lenses will introduce color fringing in out of focus areas.

2. Maximum flexibility, more sales. If a designer picks an image that is sharp throughout they can selectively defocus areas, or isolate the background, etc. If you have blurred edges it is hard to do isolations after the fact. I think an image with thin depth of field has a more restricted market.

3. Bokeh - it can be tricky to get pleasing out of focus areas depending on the lens and aperture. In stock a simple background is better so I usually try to find a simple background rather than try to blur it out.

Give me some examples of images with thin DOF that work for you, or arguments for and against :) I love portraits with shallow depth of field, but I just don't use it much for stock.

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December 15, 2011

Imaengine

Congrats on becoming the featured contributor!!! Here's some images that I took using shallow DOF as a technique to focus on subject: [imgl]15015352[/imgl] [imgl]15824070[/imgl] [imgl]18352071[/imgl]

Usually, shallow DOF images are rejected for low potential reasons, but I like using this technique and don't let this bother me that much!

December 07, 2011

Verdelho

Here's a couple. Enjoy. Ken

[imgl]21342293[/imgl]

[imgl]21182029[/imgl]

December 04, 2011

Yellowind

Yeah, thanks for sharing thoughts and experience. I rethink my work on food and other shooting with bokeh.

December 03, 2011

Bradcalkins

Thanks for all the photos :)

December 03, 2011

Iwhitwo

Shallow depth of field example.
An example for me would be this shot of a robin in a tree taken at F5.6 with a L series 100 - 400 at full zoom.

December 02, 2011

Nantucketphotoart

I agree with your reasons for DT to reject DOT photographs. Many of my photographs have been rejected because of DOT when I did this on purpose to emphasize the main subject.

December 02, 2011

Nantucketphotoart

I agree with your reasons for DT to reject DOT photographs. Many of my photographs have been rejected because of DOT when I did this on purpose to emphasize the main subject.

December 02, 2011

Nantucketphotoart

I agree with your reasons for DT to reject DOT photographs. Many of my photographs have been rejected because of DOT when I did this on purpose to emphasize the main subject.

December 02, 2011

Shopartgallerycom

Is not so much accepted but I love images with selective DOF. Your BAKING Cookies are great!

December 01, 2011

Peanutroaster

I've sold this one:

[imgl]https://www.dreamstime.com/music-notes-classical-sheet-music-image22070318[/imgl]

December 01, 2011

Peanutroaster

You're right - DOF can be tricky to get accepted. Your example of the cookie dough is great for showing an image that highlights one area. The paint brush also is where you'd expect the focus to be.

I've a lot of "too much of the subject is out of focus". I have managed to get a few accepted by cropping out the out of focus area.

[imgl]22214684[/imgl]

December 01, 2011

Kphotos6411

I have submitted many images with selective DOF, all have been rejected. I have noticed for several years that shallow or selective DOF pictures are widely used in magazines and greeting cards here in the US, but they are not welcome on DT.

December 01, 2011

Kphotos6411

I have submitted many images with selective DOF, all have been rejected. I have noticed for several years that shallow or selective DOF pictures are widely used in magazines and greeting cards here in the US, but they are not welcome on DT.

December 01, 2011

Davidwatmough

I have justed spotted your figure of 1900 messages on message boards maybe that keeps you in the public eye and the buyers eyes as well ? David.
PS Whatever is said and done quality counts ! and you've clearly achieved that. .

December 01, 2011

Py2000

Some examples with thin DOF that work for me:

 Kid Tattoo  Lifeguard 

I think shallow DOF works great when I do not have much control on the background. It gives better focus/pop on the main subject. Also, it's really not that difficult to take care of the noises or color fringing in the out of focus area in post-processing as those areas are not the crucial part of the images.

December 01, 2011

Bradcalkins

You have around 2500 images and around 14,000 sales in 3 years on DT ......... which looks to be far far above average.. are you a full time professional photographer ........ or just very smart....... please write a blog explaining the secrets of your success....... David.


Thanks for the nice comment :) The secret, if I have one, is short titles... Have a read of this blog of mine: https://blog.dreamstime.com/2010/04/19/is-keywording-a-self-fulfilling-prophecy-_art32223

December 01, 2011

Owaisphotography

excellent work
TFS

December 01, 2011

Davidwatmough

You have around 2500 images and around 14,000 sales in 3 years on DT ......... which looks to be far far above average.. are you a full time professional photographer ........ or just very smart....... please write a blog explaining the secrets of your success....... David.

November 30, 2011

Egomezta

Thanks for the tips, great images, good luck.

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