A simple trick for Hummingbird Photography

Those among us who have been trying to get decent pictures of Hummingbirds in flight, know about the difficulties involved: some species exhibit a rather (relatively) slow flight between their stops in the air, allowing you to focus and shoot before they resume their move which for Hummingbirds can be vertically up, down or even back!

There are some of the little species however whose movements are so hectic that it makes it really hard to focus and press the trigger in time. Besides, the camera I use is a Canon 5D MK II, not specially adequate for action, sports or wildlife shooting as it has a fps of 3.9 and it's autofocus is not considered one of it's strengths.

At my last visit to Peru at the Abra Patricia Sanctuary (northern Peru) I tried my best and had time to improvise all types of systems. Finally I came upon a trick which I want to share.

First it was a matter to identify a spot where the hummingbirds come to feed. Of course you can shoot at a feeder but they look ugly and spoil the whole photography unless you can cut them out which is not always possible. Fortunately Hummingbirds show a strong preference for the flowers of certain plants or bushes and they like to come back to them again and again.

Then, the best you can do is to sit down as comfortably as possible and next put your autofocus on manual, focusing it on a point where the hummingbirds seem to stay (flying) more often. Your job consists now on looking through the viewfinder and as soon as a subject appears and seems to be sharp you press the trigger and shot a few shots depending on your fps rate or as long as the bird appears in the viewfinder. By being patient and taking my time I managed to get quite a number of keepers, definitely more then I had got trying desperately to focus on this erratically flying little jewels. I made the job without a tripod but it would be definitely useful to get one.

I am showing here just some of the pictures I got through this simple system and hope you will find it useful too.

© Physi28 ( Help)
© Physi28 ( Help)
© Physi28 ( Help)
© Physi28 ( Help)

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July 30, 2012

Mudplucker

wow, that's awesome. I don't have the patience to wait for a hummingbird but it sure is nice to know the method you used to get those great shots ! Thanks !!!

July 30, 2012

Mcjanice

Great shots and thanks for the tip, I have yet to get a decent one of hummingbirds except on a feeder!

July 29, 2012

Wordplanet

Beautiful photos and a helpful tip. Thanks!

July 29, 2012

Adeliepenguin

Wonderful images! Thank you for the "tips". I will certainly try them out the next time some hummingbirds come to visit my yard.

July 27, 2012

Cleaper

Beautiful images!

July 27, 2012

Laurasinelle

Thanks for sharing! Great images!

July 27, 2012

Thevegetable

cool photo,, :)
thanks for sharing your trick

July 27, 2012

Psmpics

These are stunning images. Thanks for including them in your post.

July 27, 2012

Psmpics

These are stunning images. Thanks for including them in your post.

July 27, 2012

Halilin

Thanks for sharing...

July 26, 2012

Cristalloid

Great shots! Thanks for sharing your trick...

July 26, 2012

Annemario

Great pictures! I traveled last year in the island of Dominica and tried to take some decent photos of hummingbirds..well, it was not a big success I must say. But one never learns without trying..

July 26, 2012

Inyrdreams

awesome!~ I spent a frustrting day trying to get 6 hummingbirds in my parents back yard... very few keepers~! ready to try again

July 26, 2012

Egomezta

Thanks for sharing....

July 26, 2012

Davidwatmough

Very clever well done nice pictures. David

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Photo credits: Joan Egert.