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Color settings

Jimakosbook
Hi, i just want ask which color settings are you using in photoshop, and if someone knows the difference between sRGB and adobe RGB (1998).
Thanx a lot
Posted: 07/18/2012, 06:04:04 AM
Parkinsonsniper
AdobeRGB is a wider gamut than sRGB. ProphotoRGB is wider than both.

ProphotoRGB > AdobeRGB > sRGB

Wide is good, because it means more colors and more colors means smoother gradients.

On the other hand, most browsers are set to show the pictures in sRGB. So I shoot at AdobeRGB, work on a 16bit file set to AdobeRGB and upload my photos at sRGB. My monitor is set to sRGB, but the image processor can automatically detect color profile and show it in the right way. When you finish your edit, you have to "convert" your file to sRGB. It's vital. If you "set" the color profile to sRGB, than colors won't change and you will have wrong colors in your picture. You have to convert it :)) (it took me some time to memorize this, that's why I repeat) "convert" :))

...and please keep in mind that, even the best LCD monitors cannot show the total AdobeRGB gamut. So don't expect a visual change. It mostly effects the print process.

Please someone correct me if I made mistakes in my post :)
f2.8 - Nikkor 50mm f1.4 - Nikkor 50mm f1.8 - Tamron 90mm f2....
Edited: 07/18/2012, 07:08:41 AM
Adpower99

Originally posted by Parkinsonsniper:
Quoted Message: ...and please keep in mind that, even the best LCD monitors cannot show the total AdobeRGB gamut. So don`t expect a visual change. It mostly effects the print process.

Please someone correct me if I made mistakes in my post :)


I'm definitely no expert on color profiles, but I do know that the DT website is optimized for sRGB. Therefore, uploaded images should be in that colorspace or the colors will tend to appear dull. If you search the boards you will find that this has been confirmed by DT admins and I have experienced it myself.
mm, Sigma 105 mm macro...
Posted: 07/18/2012, 08:13:11 AM
Parkinsonsniper
Yes this is a nice addition and I didn't know that, too...
f2.8 - Nikkor 50mm f1.4 - Nikkor 50mm f1.8 - Tamron 90mm f2....
Posted: 07/18/2012, 08:28:27 AM
Jimakosbook
nice info, thank you both, but as far i can understand it must be better to work with AdobeRGB(more colors) and maybe then convert the picture to sRGB, am i right?
thanks
Posted: 07/18/2012, 09:45:38 AM
Lightart
yes
IS, Canon 17-40mm L, Canon 100mm F/2.8 Macro, and, occassionally, a C...
Posted: 07/18/2012, 12:41:32 PM
Parkinsonsniper
Yes x 2 :)

Because, your camera is not capable of getting more colors than AdobeRGB, so working with ProphotoRGB is like interpolating an image to a higher resolution.

Work on a 16bit AdobeRGB file, then convert it to sRGB and save it as jpeg :)
f2.8 - Nikkor 50mm f1.4 - Nikkor 50mm f1.8 - Tamron 90mm f2....
Posted: 07/18/2012, 14:51:25 PM
Suateracar
I also benefited much. thanks :)
2.8 IS Tokina 11-16 mm f:2.8 Canon EF 50 mm F:1.4 Canon EF 28-135 ...
Posted: 07/18/2012, 15:31:38 PM
Androniques
After all correct things said, let me just emphasize that if you shoot AdobeRGB you have to be sure that your photo-editing software is set to work in that same colour-mode/palette - AdobeRGB Do not open or save AdobeRGB image as sRGB, because that's when you will lose saturation! As was said above, before saving sRGB, one has to convert to sRGB, and not simply "save as..".
photos), Canon PS-A610 (rarely, very good at macro with ada...
Edited: 07/18/2012, 18:01:06 PM
Janceluch

Originally posted by Parkinsonsniper:
Quoted Message: ... Because, your camera is not capable of getting more colors than AdobeRGB, so working with ProphotoRGB is like interpolating an image to a higher resolution...

Parkinsonsniper - just to make your quote more accurate - you are right in case you are shooting in jpeg - than AdobeRGB is the widest gamut your camera can save to. But your camera's sensor is not limited to that gamut, so when shooting in RAW, than color data are recorded "as are" - right out of the sensor and using ProphotoRGB to work with RAW files ensures you are not "cropping" any color at the beginning... Of course after finishing RAW part of process you convert to smaller gamuts with proper rendering intent...
The rendering intent is crucial as well, because it controls how the data will be translated into smaller color space (like adopting image to smaller size - you can resize, or you can crop) - with "relative colorimetric" you are cropping off the non-fitting colors while retaining the fitting colors at their positions, with "perceptual" you fit the "edges" (brightes point in wide to brightes narrow gamut point, wide black point to narrow black point etc...) and recalculate everything in-between to retain smooth gradients... The relative colorimetric intent can cause some bending (usually in bright vivid areas like skies), the perceptual decreases the saturation a bit, but retains the smooth gradients... It is a bit more complicated, but this was a simplified version just to make the purpose of rendering intent undertstandable :)
and editing images :)...
Edited: 07/22/2012, 04:03:04 AM
Androniques

Originally posted by Parkinsonsniper:
Quoted Message: Yes x 2 :)Because, your camera is not capable of getting more colors than AdobeRGB, so working with ProphotoRGB is like interpolating an image to a higher resolution.Work on a 16bit AdobeRGB file, then convert it to sRGB and save it as jpeg :)


How do you know that "your camera is not capable of getting more colors than AdobeRGB"? - Are you talking of the camera RGB preset, or in principle? Also, could you explain how one can get 16bit AdobeRGB to work on, except from RAW-format.

Janceluch, thank you for your informative addition about the rendering intent! I have always used "perceptual" (because the pictures looked nicer to my eye) but had no idea of the palette cropping/scaling differences between the different intents.
photos), Canon PS-A610 (rarely, very good at macro with ada...
Posted: 07/22/2012, 05:21:04 AM
Parkinsonsniper
Andrey :) I was thinking about the jpeg format when I said "your camera is not capable of getting more bla bla". As Janceluch mentioned, our cameras are able of getting more colors than AdobeRGB in raw format. But it is not useful to work on bigger gamuts like ProphotoRGB. I work on AdobeRGB and convert the file to sRGB just before saving the jpeg and png files. I very rarely use ProphotoRGB, if there are some clipped areas in skin tones (red and yellow), then I convert the file to sRGB again :(

I hate to upload sRGB files. Why we intentionally decrease the gamut, while we can give more?

And the second question...there is no way of shooting in 16bit, except RAW. Even the RAW format is not 16bit, but 14bit in high level DSLRs (D300 and higher) and 12bit in other DSLRs. I don't think there is a huge difference between 12bit and 14bit. My eyes cannot see and my screen cannot show the difference...maybe in gradients, maybe!

My camera supports tiff format too. But I never use it because it's 8bit and don't have the flexibilty of Raw :) I just shoot raw...and then do whatever I want in post processing. That's simpler and easier for me :))
f2.8 - Nikkor 50mm f1.4 - Nikkor 50mm f1.8 - Tamron 90mm f2....
Edited: 08/28/2012, 02:44:46 AM